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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever found in the catalog.

History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever

Thomas Condie

History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever

which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, 1798.

by Thomas Condie

  • 355 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by From the press of R. Folwell. in Philadelphia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Yellow fever -- Philadelphia, 1798.,
  • Philadelphia (Pa.) -- Statistics, Vital.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBy Thomas Condie & Richard Folwell.
    SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 35335., Early American imprints -- no. 35336.
    ContributionsFolwell, Richard, 1768?-1814., Rittenhouse, David, 1732-1796.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination108, xxxii, [68] p.
    Number of Pages108
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14590295M

    This is a list of the biggest known epidemics (including pandemics) caused by an infectious read non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer are not included.. An epidemic is the rapid spread of disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. For example, in meningococcal infections, an attack rate in excess of To date, yellow fever has acquired synonyms, including American Pestilence, Barbados Distemper, Continua Putrida, Icteroides Caroliniensis, Yellow Jack, etc. United States Army physician William C. Gorgas states that yellow fever can be eradicated, .

    But it is a common winter fever, in the Carolinas, af|ter sickly summers; and in the northern states, sporadic cases of it occur with all its formidable symptoms. Instances will be hereafter mentioned. It is the pestilence of winter, and rarely, if ever appears, except when .   Bull. History Med. 42, , Carrigan J. A. The yellow fever panic of in Louisiana. Louisiana Stud. 6, 8, Augustin G. History of Yellow Fever, pp. Searcy & Pfaff, New Orleans, Dowell G. Yellow Fever and Malarial Diseases Embracing a History of the Epidemics of Yellow Fever in Texas pp.

    Paul S. Mead. INFECTIOUS AGENT. The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis.. TRANSMISSION. Usually through the bite of infected rodent fleas. Less common exposures include handling infected animal tissues (hunters, wildlife personnel), inhalation of infectious droplets from cats or dogs with plague, and, rarely, contact with a pneumonic plague patient. Yellow fever is a viral infection spread by a particular type of mosquito. The infection is most common in areas of Africa and South America, affecting travelers to and residents of those areas. In mild cases, yellow fever causes a fever, headache, nausea and vomiting.


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History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever by Thomas Condie Download PDF EPUB FB2

History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, by: Condie, Thomas. Published: (). History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, History of the pestilence by: Condie, Thomas.

Published: (). Get this from a library. History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, [Thomas Condie; Richard Folwell; American Imprint Collection (Library of Congress); Miscellaneous Pamphlet Collection (Library of Congress); Joseph Meredith Toner Collection (Library of Congress); Marian S.

Carson Collection. History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, Philadelphia: From the Press of R. Folwell, [] (DLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors.

Similar Items. History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, by: Condie, Thomas.

Published: (). Add to Book Bag Remove from Book Bag Saved in: History of the pestilence: commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of History of the pestilence, September & October, /. Similar Items. History of the pestilence: commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, / by: Condie, Thomas.

Published: (). History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet.

search Search the Wayback Machine. Featured texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top American Libraries Canadian. Letters from Rush to his wife, Julia, during the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia form a substantial part of the correspondence.

Condie, Thomas. History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of. Get this from a library. History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever: which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, [Thomas Condie; Richard Folwell; David Rittenhouse].

The influence that disease has had on history has often been hidden behind the more 'glorious' exploits of individuals and monarchs. In Armies of Pestilence R.S. Bray offers a fresh contribution to the impact that illnesses have had on world history.

The periods discussed span from the Biblical accounts of epidemics, through the Justinian plague (what was that deadly disease that has kept 3/5(1). The death toll from a yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia hits on Octo By the time it ended, 5, people were dead.

Yellow fever, or. Diseases and epidemics of the 19th century included long-standing epidemic threats such as smallpox, typhus and yellow addition, cholera emerged as an epidemic threat and spread worldwide in six pandemics in the nineteenth century.

The third plague pandemic emerged in China in the mid-nineteenth century and spread worldwide in the s. The evolutionary origins of yellow fever most likely came from Africa. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the virus originated from East or Central Africa, with transmission between primates and humans, and spread from there to West Africa.

The virus as well as the vector Aedes aegypti, a mosquito species, were probably brought to the western hemisphere and the Americas by slave trade ships. Folwell,Richard,?, Title(s): History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, / by Thomas Condie & Richard Folwell.

III. A treatise of the synochus icteroides, or yellow fever. By William Currie IV. A short history of the yellow fever. By Richard Folwell. History of the pestilence commonly called the yellow fever By Thomas Condie and Richard Folwell. NLM ID: R[Book]. During the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia, 5, or more people were listed in the official register of deaths between August 1 and November vast majority of them died of yellow fever, making the epidemic in the city of 50, people one of the most severe in United States the end of September, 20, people had fled the city.

Yellow fever is a viral disease of typically short duration. In most cases, symptoms include fever, chills, loss of appetite, nausea, muscle pains particularly in the back, and headaches. Symptoms typically improve within five days. In about 15% of people, within a day of improving the fever comes back, abdominal pain occurs, and liver damage begins causing yellow skin.

History of the pestilence, commonly called yellow fever, which almost desolated Philadelphia, in the months of August, September & October, / By Thomas Condie & Richard Folwell. Publication info: Ann Arbor, MI:: Text Creation Partnership, Rights/Permissions.

A History of the Yellow Fever: The Yellow Fever Epidemic ofin Memphis, Tenn., Embracing a Complete List of the Dead, the Names of the Doctors and Nurses Employed, Names of All who Contributed Money Or Means, and the Names and History of the Howards, Together with Other Data, and Lists of the Dead Elsewhere.The account given in the history of the disease, is, that it was at first called by physicians a "malignant fever." One of the faculty, a man probably of more observation and firm|ness than the others, affirmed the distemper to be pestilential, and for his audacity, was imprisoned by the Viceroy, who ap|prehended the report might injure the.The first significant yellow fever outbreak struck New Orleans inkilling over people at a time when the city’s population was under 9, most of whom lived within today’s French.